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Book 10  p. 366
(Score 1.08)

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Book 10  p. 320
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Book 10  p. 264
(Score 1.04)

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Book 10  p. 457
(Score 1.02)

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Book 10  p. 284
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Book 10  p. 400
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Book 10  p. 310
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Book 10  p. 48
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62 OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
vestments, bearing the arm-bone of the saint ; then
they passed the Cross, the fountain of which flowed
with wine, ? whereof all might drink,? says Leland.
Personages representing the angel Gabriel, the
Virgin, Justice treading Nero under foot, Force
bearing a pillar, Temperance holding a horse?s
bit, and Prudence triumphing over Sardanapalus,
met them at the Nether Bow; and from there,
preceded by music, they proceeded to Holyrood,
where a glittering crowd of ecclesiastics, abbots,
and friars, headed by the Archbishop of St. Andrews,
conveyed them to the high altar, and after
Te Deum was sung, they passed through the
cloisters into the new palace. Fresh ceremonies
took place in a great chamber thereof, the arras
of which represented Troy, and the coloured windows
of which were filled with the arms of Scotland
and England, the Bishop of Moray acting
as master of the ceremonies, which seems to have
included much ?? kyssing ? all round.
On the 8th of August the marriage took place,
and all the courtiers wore their richest apparel,
James sat in a chair of crimson velvet, ?the pannels
of that sam gylte under hys cloth of estat, of blue
velvet figured with gold.? On his right hand was
the Archbishop of York, on his left the Earl of
Surrey, while the Scottish prelates and nobles led
in the girl-queen, crowned ?with a vary nche
crowne of gold, garnished with perles,? to the high
altar, where, amid the blare of trumpets, the Archbishop
of Glasgow solemnised the marriage. The
banquet followed in a chamber hung with red and
blue, where the royal pair sat under a canopy of
cloth of gold ; and Margaret was served at the first
course with a slice from ? a wyld borres hed gylt,
within a fayr platter.? Lord Grey held the ewer
and Lord Huntly the towel.
The then famous minstrels of Aberdeen came
to Holyrood to sing on this occasion, and were
all provided with silver badges, on which the arms
of the granite city were engraved.
Masques and tournaments followed. James,
skilled in all the warlike exercises of the time,
appeared often in the lists as the savage knight,
attended by followers dressed as Pans and satyrs.
The festivities which accompanied this mamage
indicate an advancement in refinement and splehdour,
chiefly due to the princely nature kindness,
and munificence of James IV.
?? The King of Scotland,? wrote the Spanish ambassador
Don Pedro de Ayala, ?is of middle
height ; his features are handsome ; he never cuts
his hair or beard, and it becomes him well. He
expressed himself gracefully in Latin, French, German,
Flemish, Italian, and Spanish. His pronunciation
of Spanish was clearer than that of other
foreigners. In addition to his own, he speaks
the language of the savages (or Celts) who live
among the distant mountains and islands. The
books which King James reads most are the Bible
and those of devotion and prayer. He also studies.
old Latin and French chronicles. . . . , . .
He never ate meat on Wednesday, Friday, or
Saturday. He would not for any consideration
mount horseback on Sunday, not even to go to
mass, Before transacting any business he heard twa
masses. In the smallest matters, and even when
indulging in a joke, he always spoke the truth. . . . . The Scots,? continues De Ayala, ?are
often considered in Spain to be handsomer, than the
English. The women of quality were free in their
manners and courteous to strangers The Scottish
ladies reign absolute mistresses in their own. houses,
and the men in all domestic matters yield a.
chivalrous obedience to them. The people live
well, having plenty of beef, mutton, fowl, and fish.
The humbler classes-the women especially-are of
a very religious turn of mind. Altogether, I found,
the Scots to be a very agreeable and, I must add,,
an amiable people.?
Such, says the author of the ?? Tudor Dynasty,??
was the Scotland of the sixteenth century, a period
described by modem writers as one of barbarism,
ignorance, and superstition ; but thus it was the
Spanish ambassador painted the king and his,
Scots of the days of Flodden.
? In the year 1507,? says Hawthornden, ?James,
Prince of Scotland and the Isles, was born at
Holyrood House the 21st of January,? and the
queen being brought nigh unto death, ?the king,
overcome by affection and religious vows,? went
on a pilgrimage to St. Ninian?s in Galloway, and
(? at his return findeth the queen recovered.?
In 1517 we read of a brawl in Holyrood, when
James Wardlaw, for striking Robert Roger to the
effusion of blood within ?? my Lord Governor?s chalmer
and palace of pece,? was conveyed to the
Tron, had his hand stricken through, and was.
banished for life, under pain of death.
The governor was the Regent Albany, who took
office after Flodden, and during his residence at
Holyrood he seems to have proceeded immediately
with the works at the palace which the fatal battle
had interrupted, and which James IV. had continued
till his death. The accounts of the treasurer
show that building was in progress then, throughout
the years 1515 and 1516 ; and after Albany
quitted the kingdom for the last time, James V.
came to Holyrood, where he was crowned in 1524,
and remained there, as Pitscottie tells, for ?the ... OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. vestments, bearing the arm-bone of the saint ; then they passed the Cross, the fountain ...

Book 3  p. 62
(Score 0.98)

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Book 10  p. 419
(Score 0.96)

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Book 9  p. 171
(Score 0.95)

Salisbury Road.] THE HOSPITAL FOR INCURABLES. 5<
three plain shields under a moulding, with the date
1741-
Though disputed by some, Sciennes Hill House
once the residence of Professor Adam Fergusson
author of the (? History of the Roman Republic,?
is said to have been the place where Sir Waltei
Scott was introduced to Robert Burns in 1786
when that interesting incident occurred which ir
related by Sir Walter himself in the following letter
which occurs in Lockhart?s Life of him :--?As foi
Rums, I may truly say, 1GYgiZimn vidi tantum. I
was a lad of fifteen in 1786-7, when he first cam?
to Edinburgh, but had sense and feeling enough to
he much interested in his poetry, and would have
given the world to know him; but I had very
little acquaintance with any literary people, and
less with the gentry of the West County, the two
sets he most frequented. I saw him one day at the
venerable Professor Fergusson?s, where there were
several gentlemen of literary reputation, among
whom I remember the celebrated Dugald Stewart.
? Ofcourse, we youngsters sat silent, and listened.
The only thing I remember which was remarkable
in Burns?s manner was the effect produced upon
him by a print of Bunbury?s, representing a soldier
lying dead on the snow, his dog sitting in misery
on one side ; on the other his widow, with a child
in her arms. These lines were written underneath
:-
? ? Cold on Canadian hills, or Minden?s plain,
Perhaps that parent wept her soldier slain-
Bent o?er her babe, her eyes dissolved in dew,
The big drops mingling with the drops he drew,
Gave the sad presage of his future years,
The child of misery baptised in tears.?
?? Burns seemed much affected by the print, or
Tather, the ideas which it suggested to his mind.
He actually shed tears. He asked whose the lines
were, and it chanced that nobody but myself remembered
that they occur in a half-forgotten poem
of Langhorne?s, called by the unpromising title of
? The Justice of the Peace.? I whispered my information
to a friend present, who mentioned it to
Burns, who rewarded me with a look and a word,
which, though of mere civility, I then received,
and still recollect, with very great pkasuye.?
Westward of Sciennes Hill is the new Trades
Maiden. Hospital, in the midst of a fine grassy
park, called Rillbank. The history of this
charitable foundation, till its transference here, we
have already given elsewhere fully. Within its
walls is preserved the ancient ?( Blue Blanket,? or
banner of the city, of which there will be found
an engraving on page 36 of Volume I.
In Salisbury Road, which opens eastward off
Minto Street, is the Edinburgh Hospital for Incurables,
founded in 1874; and through the chanty
of the late Mr. J. A. Longmore, in voting a grant
of &IO,OOO for that purpose, provided the institution
?? should supply accommodation for incurable
patients of all classes, and at the same time commemorate
Mr. Longmore?s munificent bequest for
the relief of such sufferers,? the directors were
enabled,in 1877, to secure Nos. g and 10 in this
thoroughfare. The building has a frontage of 160
feet by 180 feet deep. It consists of a central
block and two wings, the former three storeys high,
and the latter two. The wards for female patients
measure about 34 feet by 25 feet, affording accommodation
for about ten beds.
Fronting the entrance door to the corridors are
SEAL OA THE CONVENT OF ST. KATHARINE.
(After H. Laing.)
ieparate staircases, one leading to the female
iepartment, the other to the male. On each floor
.he bath, nurses? rooms, gic., are arranged similarly.
[n the central block are rooms for ?paying patients.??
The wards are heated with Manchester open fire-
)laces, while the corridors are fitted up with hot
Mater-pipes. The wards afford about 1,100 cubic
?eet of space for each patient.
Externally the edifice is treated in the Classic
;tyle. In rear of it a considerable area of ground
ias been acquired, and suitably laid out. The site
:ost A4,000, and the hospital LIO,OOO. Since it
Nas opened there have been on an average one hunlred
patients in it, forty of whom were natives of
Edinburgh, and some twenty or so from England
md Ireland. The funds contributed for its support
ire raised entirely in the city. It was formally
3pened in December, 1880.
A little way south from this edifice, in South ... Road.] THE HOSPITAL FOR INCURABLES. 5< three plain shields under a moulding, with the ...

Book 5  p. 55
(Score 0.93)

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Book 10  p. 315
(Score 0.92)

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Book 10  p. 347
(Score 0.91)

High Street.] MISS NICKY MURRAY. 243
in the charter room of the burgh, dated 1723, is
described as being ?that big hall, or great room,
now known by the name of the Assembly House,
twice upon it in one night, and often the most
beautiful girls in the city passed it, as inere spectators,
which threw serious duties on the gentlemen
There it was that the Honourable Miss Nicky
Murray reigned supreme as lady-directress and
goddess of fashion, for many years during the
middle of the eighteenth century. She was a
sister of the Earl of Mansfield, and was a woman
possessed of much good sense, firmness, knowledge
of the world, and of the characters of those by
whom she was surrounded. With her sisters she
lived long in one of the tenements at the head of
Bailie Fyfe?s Close, where she annually received
whole broods of fair country cousins, who came to
town to receive the finishing touches of a girl?s education,
and be introduced to society-the starched
and stately society of old Edinburgh.
The Assembly Room was in the close to which
it gave its name. It had a spacious lobby, lighted
by sconces, where the gilded sedans set down their
powdered, hooped, and wigged occupants, while
links flared, liveried valets jostled, and swords were
sometimes drawn; and where a reduced gentleman-
a claimant to the ancient peerage of Kirkcudbnght-
sold gloves, for which he was rather
ungenerously sneered at by Oliver Goldsmith.
From this lobby the dancing-hall opened at
once, and up-stairs was a tea-room. The former
had in its centre a railed space,-within which were
the dancers ; while the spectators, we are told, sat
on the outside, and no communication was permitted
between the different sides of this sacred
pale. Here it was that in 1753 Goldsmith first
saw, with some astonishment, the formalities of
the old Scottish balls. He relates that on entering
the dancing-room he saw one end of it taken up
by the ladies, who ?sat dismally in a group by
themselves. ?On the other end stand their
pensive partners that are to be, but no more
intercourse between the sexes than between two
countries at war. The ladies, indeed, may ogle,
and the gentlemen sigh, but an embargo is laid on
any closer commerce.?
The lady directress occupied a high chair, or
species of throne, upon a dais at one end, and
thereon sat Miss Nicky Murray in state. Her
immediate predecessors there had been Mrs.
Browne of Colstoun, and Lady Minto, daughter
of Sir Robert Stuart of Allanbank.
The whole arrangements were ofa rigid character,
iartner for the whole year! The arrangements
were generally made at some preliminary ball or
Ither gathering, when a gentleman?s cocked hat
was unflapped and the ladies? fans were placed
;herein, and, as in a species of ballot, the beaux
hew forth the latter, and to whomsoever the fan
3elonged he was to be the partner for the season,
I system often productive of absurd combinations
md many a petty awkwardness. ? Then,? as Sir
Alexander Boswell wrote-
? The Assembly Clbse received the fair-
Order and elegance presided there-
Each gay Right Honourable had her place,
To walk a minuet with becoming grace.
No racing to the dance, with rival hurry-
Such was thy sway, 0 famed Miss Nicky Murray !
Each lady?s fan a chosen Damon bore,
With care selected many a day before ;
For, unprovided with a favourite beau,
The nymph, chagrined, the ball must needs forego,
But previous matters to her taste arranged,
Certes, the constant couple never changed ;
Through a long night, to watch fair Delia?s will,
The same dull swain was at her elbow still.??
With sword at side, and often hat in hand, the
gallants of those days escorted the chairs of their
partners home to many a close and wynd now the
ibode of squalor and sordid poverty; for much
Df stately and genuine old-fashioned gallantry prevailed,
as if it were part of the costume, referred
to by the poet :-
? Shades of my fathers ! in your pasteboard skirts,
Your broidered waistcoats and your plaited shirts,
Your formal bag-wigs, wide extended cuffs,
Your five-inch chitterlings and nine-inch ruffs.
Gods! how ye strut at times in all your state,
Amid the visions of my thoughtful pate ! ?
Those who attended the assemblies belonged
exclusively to the upper circle of society that then,
existed in Edinburgh ; and Miss Murray, on
hearing a young lady?s name mentioned to her for
approval, was wont to ask, ?? Miss-of what? ? and,
if no territorial or family name followed, she might
dismiss the matter by a wave of her fan, for,
according to her views, it was necessary to be
??a lady 0? that ilk;? and it is well known, that
?upon one occasion, seeing at an assembly a
wan who had been raised to wealth in some ... Street.] MISS NICKY MURRAY. 243 in the charter room of the burgh, dated 1723, is described as being ?that ...

Book 2  p. 243
(Score 0.9)

canongate.] ROXBURGH HOUSE. 15
~~ House, there stood in those days the mansion of
the Earls of Roxburgh, surrounded by a beautiful
As a set-off against these items, we have the following,
in 1660-1, when Argyle?s fate came :-
To Alexander Davidson for a new axe to ye
Maiden, and is to maintain it all ye days of his
life . . . . . * . . . . p 12 o
To 4 Drummers when ArgyZe and Swzjtton were
brought from Leith . . . . . 14 8 o
To 17 extra Drummers, a days, when Montrose
was buried and Argyle executed . . , 21 12 o
The marquis was interred amid great pomp in
the Church of St. Giles at the Restoration; but
when a search was made for his remains in the
Chepman aisle, in April, 1879, no trace of them
whatever could be found there.
Amid the gloom and?horror of scenes such as
these executions, and the general events of the wars
of the Covenant, all traces of gaiety, and especially
of theatrical entertainments, disappeared in Edinburgh,
as forbidden displays; but in January,. 1659,
the citizens were regaled with the sight of a travelling
dromedary, the first that had ever been in
Scotland. Nicoll describes it as ?ane heigh great
beast, callit ane dummodary, quhilk being keepit
clos in the Canongate, none had a sight of it, without
three pence the person. . . . . It was
very big, and of great height, cloven futted like
unto a kow, and on the bak ane saitt, as it were
a sadill to sit on. Thair was brocht in with it ane
lytill baboun, faced lyke unto an aip.?
In 1686 the public attendance at mass by some
of the officers of state excited a tumult in the city,
and many persons of rank were insulted on returning
therefrom by the rioters. One of these, a
journeyman baker, was, by order of the Privy
Council, whipped through the Canongate, and
ultimately the Foot Guards had to fire on the mob
that assembled.
In that year an Act of Parliament empowered
the magistrates to impose a tax of A500 sterling
yearly, for three years, to cleanse the town and
Canongate, and free both from beggars ; and in 1687
the whole members of the College of Justice voluntarily
offered to bear their full share of this tax,
and appointed two of their body to be present when
it was levied.
In 1692 we find an instance in the Canongate
of one of the many troubles which in those days
arose from corporation privileges, by which the
poor and industrious tradesman was made the
victim of monopoly.
In the open ground which now surrounds Milton
I which performs the whole journey in thirteen days,
I without any stoppage (if God permit), having eighty
Fepairs in this house, when Thomas Kinloch, Dea-
:on of the Wrights in the Canongate, came with
Jthers, and violently carried off all the tools of
Somerville and his workmen, on the plea that they
were not freemen of the burgh; and when the
tools were demanded formally, two days after,
they were withheld.
Robert, Earl of Roxburgh (who afterwards died
m his travels abroad), was then a minor, but his
curators resented the proceedings of Kinloch, and
sued him for riot and *oppression. Apparently, if
the Roxburgh mansion had been subject to the
jurisdiction of the Canongate, the Privy Council
would have given no redress ; but when the earl?s
ancestor, in 1636, had given up the superiority
of the Canongate, as he reserved his house to be
holden of the Crown, it was found that the local
corporation had no right to interfere with his
workmen, and Somerville?s tools were restored to
him by order of the Council.
Earl Robert was succeeded in this house by his
brother John, fifth Earl and first Duke of Roxburgh,
K.G., who sold his Union vote for LSOO,
became Secretary of State for Scotland in 1716,
and died in 1741.
Long ere that time the effect of the Union had
done its worst upon the old court burgh. Maitland,
writing in 1753, says :-?This place has suffered
more by the inion of the kingdoms than all the
other parts of Scotland : for having, before that
period, been the residence of the chief of the
Scottish nobility, it was thqn in a flourishing condition
; but being deserted by them, many of their
houses are fallen down, and others in a ruinous
condition ; it is in a piteous case ! ?
Five years after the Union we find a London
coach announced as starting from the Capongate,
the advertisement for which, with regard to expedition,
comfort, and economy, presents a curious contrast
to the announcements of to-day, and is worth
giving at length, as we find it in the NkwcastZe
Cau~unt of October, I 7 I 2.
? Edinburgh, Berwick, Newcastle, Durham, and
London Stage-coach begins on Monday, 13th
October, 1712. All that desire to pass from
Edinbro? to London, or from London to Edinbro?,
or any place on that road, let them repair to Mr.
John Baillie?s, at the Coach and Horses at the head
of the Canongate, every Saturday, or the Black
Swan in Holborn, every other Monday, at both of
which places they may be received in a stagexoach ... ROXBURGH HOUSE. 15 ~~ House, there stood in those days the mansion of the Earls of Roxburgh, ...

Book 3  p. 15
(Score 0.9)

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Book 10  p. 504
(Score 0.89)

Arlhur?s Seat.] DR. JOHN BELL 303
sity of Edinburgh that the Medical Society has
contributed much to the prosperity and reputation
of this school of physic.?
Such are still the objects of the Royal Medical
Society, which has now, however, quitted its old
hall and chambers for newer premises in 7 Melbourne
Place. Its staff consists of four presidents,
two honorary secretaries, curators of the library
and museum, with a treasurer and sub-librarian.
Many old citizens of good position had residences
in and near the High School yards and
Surgeon Square. Among these was Mr. George
Sinclair of Ulbster, who married Janet daughter of
Lord Strathmore, and who had a house of seven
rooms in the yard, which was advertised in the
Courant of 1761. His son was the eminent agriculturist,
and first baronet of the family.
In 1790 a theatre for dissections and an anatomical
museum were erected in Surgeon Square
by Dr. John Bell, the eminent anatomist, who was
born in the city on the 12th May, 1763, and who
most successfully applied the science of anatomy
to practical surgery-a profession to which, curiously
enough, he had from his birth been devoted by
his father. The latter,about a month before the
child?s birth, had-when in his 59th yea-undergone
with successapainful surgicaloperation, and his gratitude
led him tovowhe would rear his son John to the
cause of medicine for the relief of mankind ; and
after leaving the High School the boy was duly
apprenticed to Mr. Alexander Wood, surgeon, and
soon distinguished himself in chemistry, midwifery,
and surgery, and then anatomy, which had been
somewhat overlooked by Munro.
In the third year after his anatomical theatre
had been opened in the now obscure little square,
he published his ? Anatomy of the Human Body,?
consisting of a description of the action and play
of the bones, muscles, and joints. In 1797 appeared
the second volume, treating of the heart
and arteries. During a brilliant career, he devoted
himself with zeal to his profession, till in 1816 he
was thrown from his horse, receiving a shock from
which his constitution never recovered.
CHAPTER XXXVII.
AKTHUR?S SEAT AND ITS VICINITY.
The Sanctuary-Geology of the Hill-Origin of its Name, and that of the Craigs-The Park Walls, 2554-A Banquet alfrrsc6The Pestilence
-A Duel-?The Guttit Haddie?-Mutiny of the Old 78th Regiment-Proposed House on the Summit-bfuschat and his Cairn-
Radical Road Formed-May Day-Skeletons found at the Wells 0? Wearic-Park Improvements-The Hunter?s Bog-Legend of the
Hangman?s big-Duddingston-The Church-Rev. J. Thomson-Robert Monteith-The Loch-Its Sw-ans-Skatcrs--The Duddingston
Thoro-The Argyle and Abercorn FamilisThe Earl of Mob-Lady Flon. HastingsCnuvin?s Hospica-Parson?s Grecn-St.
Anlhonfs Chapel and Well-The Volunteer Renew before the Queen.
TAKING up the history of the districts of the city
in groups as we have done, we now come to Arthur?s
Seat, which is already well-nigh surrounded, especially
on the west and north, by streets and
mansions.
Towering to the height of 822 feet above the
Forth, this hill, with the Craigs of Salisbury, occupies
the greater portion of the ancient Sanctuary of
Holyrood, which included the royal park (first
enclosed and improved from a condition of natural
forest by James V. and Queen Mary), St. Anne?s
Yard and the Duke?s Walk (both now obliterated),
the Hermitage of St. Anthony, the Hunter?s Bog,
and the southern parks as far as Duddingston, a
tract of five miles in circumference, in which persons
were safe from their creditors for twenty-four
hours, after which they must take out a Protectim,
as it was called, issued by the bailie of the abbey ;
the debtors were then at liberty to go where they
pleased on Sundays, without molestation j but later
legal alterations have rendered retirement to the
Sanctuary to a certain extent unnecessary.
The recent formation of the Queen?s Drive
round the hill, and the introduction of the rifle
ranges in the valley to the north of it, have destroyed
the wonderful solitude which for ages
reigned there, even in the vicinity of a busy and
stormy capital. Prior to these changes, and in
some parts even yet, the district bore the character
which Arnot gave it when he wrote :-? Seldom are
human beings to be met in this lonely vale, or any
creature to be seen, but the sheep feeding on the
mountains, or the hawks and ravens winging their
flight among the rocks?: The aspect of the lionshaped
mountain and the outline of the craig
are known to every one. There is something certainly
grand and awful in the front of mighty slope
and broken rock and precipice, which the latter
present to the city. Greenstone, which has been
upheaved through strata surfaced with sandstone ... Seat.] DR. JOHN BELL 303 sity of Edinburgh that the Medical Society has contributed much to the ...

Book 4  p. 303
(Score 0.88)

cyloagate.1 HANNAH ROBERTSON. 21
of stone with a
Panmure of Forth, and was the last who possessed
this house, in which he was resident in the middle
of the last century, and was succeeded in it by the
Countess of Aberdeen.
From 1778 till his death, in 1790, it formed the
residence of Adam Smith, author of ? The Wealth
of Nations,? after he came to Edinburgh as Commissioner
of the Customs, an appointment obtained
by the friendship of the Duke of Buccleuch. A few
days before his death, at Panmure House, he gave
orders to destroy all his mandscripts except some
detached essays, which were afterwards published
by his executors, Drs. Joseph Black and Janies
Hutton, and his library, a valuable one, he left to
his nephew, Lord Reston. From that old mansion
the philosopher was borne to his grave in an obscure
nook of the Canongate churchyard. During
the - last years of his blameless life his bachelor
household had been managed by a female cousin,
Miss Jeanie Douglas, who acquired a great control
? had attained her
From her published memoir-which, after its first
appearance in 1792, reached a tenth edition in
1806, and was printed by James Tod in Forrester?s
Wynd-and from other sources, we learn that she
was the widow of Robert Robertson, a merchant
in Perth, and was the daughter of a burgess named
George Swan, son of Charles 11. and Dorothea
Helena, daughter of John Kirkhoven, Dutch baron
of Ruppa, the beautiful Countess of Derby, who had
an intrigue with the king during the protracted
absence of her husband in Holland, Charles, eighth
earl, who died in 1672 without heirs.
According to her narrative, the child was given
to nurse to the wife of Swan, a gunner at Windsor,
a woman whose brother, Bartholomew Gibson, was
the king?s farrier at Edinburgh; and it would
further appear that the latter obtained on trust for
George Swan, from Charles 11. or his brother the
Duke of York, a grant of lands in New Jersey,
where Gibson?s son died about 1750, as would
over him.
At the end of Panmure Close
was the mansion of John
Hunter, a wealthy burgess, who
was Treasurer of the Canongate
in 1568, and who built it in
1565, when Mary was on the
throne. Wilson refers to it as
the earliest private edifice in
the burgh, and says ?it consists,
like other buildings of
the period, of a lower erection
forestair leading to the first floor, and an ornamental
turnpike within, affording access to the
upper chambers. At the top of a very steep
wooden stair, constructed alongside of the latter,
a very rich specimen of carved oak panelling
remains in good preservation, adorned with the
Scottish lion, displayed within a broad wreath and
surrounded by a variety of ornaments. The doorway
of the inner turnpike bears on the sculptured
lintel the initials I. H., a shield charged with a
chevron, and a hunting horn in base, and the
date 1565.? It bore also a comb with six teeth.
It was demolished in August, 1853.
A little lower down are Big and Little Lochend
Closes, which join each other near the bottom and
TU into the north back of the Canongate. In the
former are some good houses, but of no great antiquity.
One of these was occupied by Mr. Gordon
of Carlton in 1784; and in the other, during the
close of the last and first years of the present century,
there resided a remarkable old lady, named
Mrs Hannah Robertson, who was well known in her
time as a reputed grand-daughter of Charles 11.
appear from a notice in the
Lndon ChronicZe for 1771.
Be all this as it may, the old
lady referred to was a great
favourite with all those of
Jacobite proclivities, and at the
dinners of the Jacobite Club
always sat on the right hand of
the president, till her death,
which occurred in Little Lochend
Close in 1808, when she
eighty-fourth year, and a vast - . . .
concourse attended her funeral, which took place
in the Friends? burial-place at the Pleasance.
Unusually tall in stature, and beautiful even in old
age, her figure, with black velvet capuchin and
cane, was long familiar in the streets of Edinburgh.
From a passage in the ?Edinburgh Historical Register?
for 1791-2, she would appear to have been
a futile applicant for a pension to the Lords of the
Treasury, though she had many powerful friends,
including the Duchess of Gordon and the Countess
of Northesk, to whom she dedicated a book named
?? The Lady?s School of Arts.?
One of the most picturesque and interesting
houses in the Canongate is one situated in what
was called Davidson?s Close, the old ?White Horse
Hostel,? on a dormer window of which is the date
1603. It was known as the ?White Horse? a
century and more before the accession of the
House of Hanover, and is traditionally said to
have taken its name from a favourite white palfrey
when the range of stables that form its basement
had been occupied as the royal mews. The adjacent
Water Gate took its name from a great ... HANNAH ROBERTSON. 21 of stone with a Panmure of Forth, and was the last who possessed this house, in ...

Book 3  p. 22
(Score 0.88)

cyloagate.1 HANNAH ROBERTSON. 21
of stone with a
Panmure of Forth, and was the last who possessed
this house, in which he was resident in the middle
of the last century, and was succeeded in it by the
Countess of Aberdeen.
From 1778 till his death, in 1790, it formed the
residence of Adam Smith, author of ? The Wealth
of Nations,? after he came to Edinburgh as Commissioner
of the Customs, an appointment obtained
by the friendship of the Duke of Buccleuch. A few
days before his death, at Panmure House, he gave
orders to destroy all his mandscripts except some
detached essays, which were afterwards published
by his executors, Drs. Joseph Black and Janies
Hutton, and his library, a valuable one, he left to
his nephew, Lord Reston. From that old mansion
the philosopher was borne to his grave in an obscure
nook of the Canongate churchyard. During
the - last years of his blameless life his bachelor
household had been managed by a female cousin,
Miss Jeanie Douglas, who acquired a great control
? had attained her
From her published memoir-which, after its first
appearance in 1792, reached a tenth edition in
1806, and was printed by James Tod in Forrester?s
Wynd-and from other sources, we learn that she
was the widow of Robert Robertson, a merchant
in Perth, and was the daughter of a burgess named
George Swan, son of Charles 11. and Dorothea
Helena, daughter of John Kirkhoven, Dutch baron
of Ruppa, the beautiful Countess of Derby, who had
an intrigue with the king during the protracted
absence of her husband in Holland, Charles, eighth
earl, who died in 1672 without heirs.
According to her narrative, the child was given
to nurse to the wife of Swan, a gunner at Windsor,
a woman whose brother, Bartholomew Gibson, was
the king?s farrier at Edinburgh; and it would
further appear that the latter obtained on trust for
George Swan, from Charles 11. or his brother the
Duke of York, a grant of lands in New Jersey,
where Gibson?s son died about 1750, as would
over him.
At the end of Panmure Close
was the mansion of John
Hunter, a wealthy burgess, who
was Treasurer of the Canongate
in 1568, and who built it in
1565, when Mary was on the
throne. Wilson refers to it as
the earliest private edifice in
the burgh, and says ?it consists,
like other buildings of
the period, of a lower erection
forestair leading to the first floor, and an ornamental
turnpike within, affording access to the
upper chambers. At the top of a very steep
wooden stair, constructed alongside of the latter,
a very rich specimen of carved oak panelling
remains in good preservation, adorned with the
Scottish lion, displayed within a broad wreath and
surrounded by a variety of ornaments. The doorway
of the inner turnpike bears on the sculptured
lintel the initials I. H., a shield charged with a
chevron, and a hunting horn in base, and the
date 1565.? It bore also a comb with six teeth.
It was demolished in August, 1853.
A little lower down are Big and Little Lochend
Closes, which join each other near the bottom and
TU into the north back of the Canongate. In the
former are some good houses, but of no great antiquity.
One of these was occupied by Mr. Gordon
of Carlton in 1784; and in the other, during the
close of the last and first years of the present century,
there resided a remarkable old lady, named
Mrs Hannah Robertson, who was well known in her
time as a reputed grand-daughter of Charles 11.
appear from a notice in the
Lndon ChronicZe for 1771.
Be all this as it may, the old
lady referred to was a great
favourite with all those of
Jacobite proclivities, and at the
dinners of the Jacobite Club
always sat on the right hand of
the president, till her death,
which occurred in Little Lochend
Close in 1808, when she
eighty-fourth year, and a vast - . . .
concourse attended her funeral, which took place
in the Friends? burial-place at the Pleasance.
Unusually tall in stature, and beautiful even in old
age, her figure, with black velvet capuchin and
cane, was long familiar in the streets of Edinburgh.
From a passage in the ?Edinburgh Historical Register?
for 1791-2, she would appear to have been
a futile applicant for a pension to the Lords of the
Treasury, though she had many powerful friends,
including the Duchess of Gordon and the Countess
of Northesk, to whom she dedicated a book named
?? The Lady?s School of Arts.?
One of the most picturesque and interesting
houses in the Canongate is one situated in what
was called Davidson?s Close, the old ?White Horse
Hostel,? on a dormer window of which is the date
1603. It was known as the ?White Horse? a
century and more before the accession of the
House of Hanover, and is traditionally said to
have taken its name from a favourite white palfrey
when the range of stables that form its basement
had been occupied as the royal mews. The adjacent
Water Gate took its name from a great ... HANNAH ROBERTSON. 21 of stone with a Panmure of Forth, and was the last who possessed this house, in ...

Book 3  p. 21
(Score 0.88)

......

Book 10  p. 499
(Score 0.86)

politically. These documents had been perfidiously
sent to Scotland by General Monk. The marquis
was condemned to die the death of a traitor.
From the Castle he begged in vain a ten days?
respite, that he might crave pity of the king. ??I
placed the crown upon his head,? said he, mourn-
- fully, ? and this is my reward ! ?
An escape was planned. He lay in bed for
some days feigning iuyess, and the Marchioness
came in a sedan to visit him. Being of the same
stature, he assumed her dress and coif; but when
about to step into the sedan his courage failed him,
and he abandoned the attempt. The night before
execution he was removed to the most ancient
prison in Edinburgh-an edifice in Mauchine?s
Close, long since removed, where the Marchioness
awaited him. ?The Lord will requite it,? she exclaimed,
as she wept bitterly on his breast. ? Forbear,
Margaret,? said. he, calmly, ?I pity my
enemies, and am as content in this ignominious
prison as in yonder Castle of Edinburgh.?
With his last breath he expressed abhorrence of
the death of Charles I, and on the 27th May his
head was struck from his body by the Maiden, at
the west end of the Tolbooth. By patent all his
ancient earldom and estates were restored to his
son, h r d Lorne, then a prisoner in the Castle,
where on one occasion he had a narrow escape,
when playing ? with hand bullets ? {bowls 3) one
of which, as Wodrow records, struck him senseless.
On the 30th May, 1667, the batteries of the
Castle returned the salute of the English fleet,
which came to anchor in the roads under the
pennant of Sir Jeremiah Smythe; who came thither
in quest of the Dutch fleet, which had been bombarding
Burntisland.
Janies Duke of Alhany and York succeeded the
odious Duke Q? Lauderdale in the administration
of Scottish affairs, and won the favour of all classes,
while he resided at Holyrood awaiting the issue of
the famous Bill of Exclusion, which would deprive
him of the throne of England on the demise of
his brother, and hence it became his earnest desire
to secure at least Scotland, the hereditary kingdom
of his race. OR his fixst Visit to &e Cask, on
30th October, 1680, Mons Meg br-rst when the
guns were saluting-a ring near the touchhole
giving way, which, saith Fountainhall, was deemed
by all men a bad omen. His lordship adds that
as the gun was charged by an English gunner,
required by the obnoxious Test Act as Commis.
Goner of the Scottish Treasury; and on the 12th
Scottish manners gradually gave way before the
affability of such entertainers as the Duchess
Mary d? Este of Modena, and the Princess Anne,
?and the novel luxuries of the English court
formed an attraction to the Scottish grandees.
Tea was introduced for the first time into Scotland
on this occasion, and given by the duchess as a
great treat to the Scottish ladies. Balls, plays, and
masquerades were also attempted; but the last
proved too great an innovation on the rigid manners
of that period to be tolerated.?
The accession of King James VII. is thus recorded
by Lord Fountainhall (&? Decisions,? vol. i.) :
--?Feb. 6th, 1685. The Privy Council is called
extraordinary, on the occasion of an express sent
them by his royal highness the Duke of Albany,
telling that, on Monday the 2nd February, the king
was seized with a violent and apoplectic fit, which
stupefied him for four hours ; but, by letting twelve
ounces of blood and applying cupping-glasses to
his head, he revived. This unexpected surprise
put our statesmen in a hurly-burly, and was
followed by the news of the death of his Majesty,
which happened on the 7th of February, and came
home to us on the roth, in the morning ; whereupon
a theatre was immediately erected at the cross of
Edinburgh, and the militia companies drawn out
in arms ; and, at ten o?clock, the Chancellor,
Treasurer, and all the other officers of State, with
the nobility, lotds of Privy Council and Session, the
magistrates and town council of Edinburgh, came
to the cross, with the lion king-at-arms, his heralds
and trumpeters ; the Chance!;or carried his own
purse, and, weeping, proclaimed Jimes Duke af
Albany the ~nZy and undoubtcrt king of this realm, by
fhe-tiile of Jirnes VfL, the clerk registrar reading
the words of the Act to him, and all of them swore
faith and allegiance to him. Then the other proclamation
was then read, whereby King James VII.
continued all oAices till he had more time to send
down new commissions. . - . . Then the
Castle shot a round of guns, and sermon began,
wherein Mr. John Robertson did regret our loss,
but desiredour tears might be dried up when we
looked upon so brave and excellent a successor.
The Privy Council called foa all the seals, and broke
them, appointing new ones with the name of James
VII. to be made.?
In r68c the Earl of Argyie was committed to
the Castle for the third time for declining the oath
. having no cannon in all England so big as she.?
During the duke?s residence at Holyrood a splendid
of December ,an assize brought in their verdict, by
the Marquis of Montrose, his hereditary foe, finding ... These documents had been perfidiously sent to Scotland by General Monk. The marquis was condemned to ...

Book 1  p. 58
(Score 0.82)

politically. These documents had been perfidiously
sent to Scotland by General Monk. The marquis
was condemned to die the death of a traitor.
From the Castle he begged in vain a ten days?
respite, that he might crave pity of the king. ??I
placed the crown upon his head,? said he, mourn-
- fully, ? and this is my reward ! ?
An escape was planned. He lay in bed for
some days feigning iuyess, and the Marchioness
came in a sedan to visit him. Being of the same
stature, he assumed her dress and coif; but when
about to step into the sedan his courage failed him,
and he abandoned the attempt. The night before
execution he was removed to the most ancient
prison in Edinburgh-an edifice in Mauchine?s
Close, long since removed, where the Marchioness
awaited him. ?The Lord will requite it,? she exclaimed,
as she wept bitterly on his breast. ? Forbear,
Margaret,? said. he, calmly, ?I pity my
enemies, and am as content in this ignominious
prison as in yonder Castle of Edinburgh.?
With his last breath he expressed abhorrence of
the death of Charles I, and on the 27th May his
head was struck from his body by the Maiden, at
the west end of the Tolbooth. By patent all his
ancient earldom and estates were restored to his
son, h r d Lorne, then a prisoner in the Castle,
where on one occasion he had a narrow escape,
when playing ? with hand bullets ? {bowls 3) one
of which, as Wodrow records, struck him senseless.
On the 30th May, 1667, the batteries of the
Castle returned the salute of the English fleet,
which came to anchor in the roads under the
pennant of Sir Jeremiah Smythe; who came thither
in quest of the Dutch fleet, which had been bombarding
Burntisland.
Janies Duke of Alhany and York succeeded the
odious Duke Q? Lauderdale in the administration
of Scottish affairs, and won the favour of all classes,
while he resided at Holyrood awaiting the issue of
the famous Bill of Exclusion, which would deprive
him of the throne of England on the demise of
his brother, and hence it became his earnest desire
to secure at least Scotland, the hereditary kingdom
of his race. OR his fixst Visit to &e Cask, on
30th October, 1680, Mons Meg br-rst when the
guns were saluting-a ring near the touchhole
giving way, which, saith Fountainhall, was deemed
by all men a bad omen. His lordship adds that
as the gun was charged by an English gunner,
required by the obnoxious Test Act as Commis.
Goner of the Scottish Treasury; and on the 12th
Scottish manners gradually gave way before the
affability of such entertainers as the Duchess
Mary d? Este of Modena, and the Princess Anne,
?and the novel luxuries of the English court
formed an attraction to the Scottish grandees.
Tea was introduced for the first time into Scotland
on this occasion, and given by the duchess as a
great treat to the Scottish ladies. Balls, plays, and
masquerades were also attempted; but the last
proved too great an innovation on the rigid manners
of that period to be tolerated.?
The accession of King James VII. is thus recorded
by Lord Fountainhall (&? Decisions,? vol. i.) :
--?Feb. 6th, 1685. The Privy Council is called
extraordinary, on the occasion of an express sent
them by his royal highness the Duke of Albany,
telling that, on Monday the 2nd February, the king
was seized with a violent and apoplectic fit, which
stupefied him for four hours ; but, by letting twelve
ounces of blood and applying cupping-glasses to
his head, he revived. This unexpected surprise
put our statesmen in a hurly-burly, and was
followed by the news of the death of his Majesty,
which happened on the 7th of February, and came
home to us on the roth, in the morning ; whereupon
a theatre was immediately erected at the cross of
Edinburgh, and the militia companies drawn out
in arms ; and, at ten o?clock, the Chancellor,
Treasurer, and all the other officers of State, with
the nobility, lotds of Privy Council and Session, the
magistrates and town council of Edinburgh, came
to the cross, with the lion king-at-arms, his heralds
and trumpeters ; the Chance!;or carried his own
purse, and, weeping, proclaimed Jimes Duke af
Albany the ~nZy and undoubtcrt king of this realm, by
fhe-tiile of Jirnes VfL, the clerk registrar reading
the words of the Act to him, and all of them swore
faith and allegiance to him. Then the other proclamation
was then read, whereby King James VII.
continued all oAices till he had more time to send
down new commissions. . - . . Then the
Castle shot a round of guns, and sermon began,
wherein Mr. John Robertson did regret our loss,
but desiredour tears might be dried up when we
looked upon so brave and excellent a successor.
The Privy Council called foa all the seals, and broke
them, appointing new ones with the name of James
VII. to be made.?
In r68c the Earl of Argyie was committed to
the Castle for the third time for declining the oath
. having no cannon in all England so big as she.?
During the duke?s residence at Holyrood a splendid
of December ,an assize brought in their verdict, by
the Marquis of Montrose, his hereditary foe, finding ... These documents had been perfidiously sent to Scotland by General Monk. The marquis was condemned to ...

Book 1  p. 59
(Score 0.82)

......

Book 10  p. 243
(Score 0.82)

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