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Book 8  p. 417
(Score 1.91)

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Book 8  p. 78
(Score 1.9)

B I 0 G RA P H I CA I, S KE T C H E S. 167
No. LXXI.
ROBERT M'QUEEN OF BRAXFIELD,
LORD JUSTICE-CLERK.
THIS eminent lawyer and judge of the last century was born in 1722. His
father, John M'Queen, Esq. of Braxfield, in the county of Lanark, was educated
as a lawyer, and practised for some time ; but he gave up business on being
appointed Sheriff-substitute of the Upper Ward of Lanarkshire. He was
by no means wealthy, and having a large family, no extravagant views of
future advancement seem to have been entertained respecting his children.
Robert, who was his eldest son, received the early part of his education at the
grammar-school of the county town,' and thereafter attended a course at the
University of Edinburgh, with the view of becoming a Writer to the Signet.
In accordance with this resolution, young M'Queen was apprenticed to Mr.
Thomas Gouldie, an eminent practitioner, and, during the lat+er period of his
service, he had an opportunity of superiiitending the management of processes
before the Supreme Court. Those faculties of mind which subsequently distinguished
him both as a lawyer and a judge were thus called into active
operation ; and, feeling conscious of intellectual strength, he resolved to try his
fortune at the bar. This new-kindled ambition by no means disturbed his
arrangement with Mr. Gouldie, with whom he continued until the expiry of his
indenture. In the meantime, however, he set about the study of the civil and
feudal law, and very soon became deeply conversant in the principles of both,
especially of the latter.
In 1744, after the usual trials, he became a member of the Faculty of Advocates.
In the course of a few years afterwards, a number of questions arising
out of the Rebellion in 1745, respecting the forfeited estates, came to be decided,
in all of which M'Queen had the good fortune to be appointed counsel for
the crown. Nothing could be more opportunely favourable for demonstrating
the young advocate's talents than this fortuitous circumstance. The extent of
knowledge which he displayed as a feudal lawyer, in the management of these
cases-some of them of the greatest importance-obt,ained for him a degree of
reputation which soon became substantially apparent in the rapid increase of his
general practice. The easy unaffected manners of Mr. M'Queen also tended
much to promote success. At those meetings called consultations, which, for
many years after his admission to the bar, were generally held in taverns, he
" peculiarly shone" both in legal and social qualifications. Ultimately his practice
became so great, especially before the Lord Ordinary, that he has been repeatedly
The grammar-school of Lanark was at this period in considerable repute.
was Thomson, a relative of the author of " The Seasons," and married to his sister.
The teacher'a name ... of Edinburgh, with the view of becoming a Writer to the Signet . In accordance with this ...

Book 8  p. 237
(Score 1.84)

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Book 9  p. 200
(Score 1.82)

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Book 9  p. 120
(Score 1.79)

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Book 11  p. 27
(Score 1.74)

226 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
near Portobello. Being, however, unable to compete with the English manufacturers,
the speculation proved unsuccessful.
Mr. M'DowaIl entered the Town Council in 1775, and in politics took the
same side as his friend Sir James Hunter Blair. He was several times in the
magistracy ; and, before his retirement, was offered the Provost's chair, which
he prudently declined, in consequence of the depressed state of his manufactory.
He was a very public-spirited man, and devoted much of his time to the improvement
of the city.
The eldest, after
being unsuccessful as a merchant, settled in Van Diemen's Land, where he
obtained a grant of land, which he has denominated, after that of his ancestor,
the estate of Logan. For two of his sons Mr. M'Dowall obtained appointments
in the East India Company's Service. One of them (Colonel Robert) was nearly
thirty years in India, during which time he distinguished himself at the siege of
Seringapatam, and on various other occasions-particularly in the surprise and
complete dispersion of above 3000 Pindaries-for which he received the thanks
of the Governor-General in Council, and of the Court of Directors. He afterwards
was at the capture of Tavoy and Mergui, of which he was appointed
Governor ; but was unfortunately killed, in command of two brigades of native
infantry, at the conclusion of the Burmese war. The other son who went to
India (Mr. TNilliam), after being about twenty years in the Madras Medical
Establishment, returned to Edinburgh, taking up his residence at Bellevue
Crescent. Two other sons of Mr. M'Dowall entered the mercantile, and his
youngest son (Charles) the legal profession as a Writer to the Signet.
In the back-ground the Lord Provost (Sir James Hunter Hair) is represented
as busily employed in digging and shovelling out the earth ; while Mr.
Hay, Deacon of the Surgeons, and L most violent anti-leveller, is as eagerly
engaged in shovelling it back again. Mr. Hay was a leader of the opposition in
the Council.
This civic squabble gave birth to various local effusions j and, among others,
to a satirical poem in Latin doggerel, entitled "Streeturn Eclinense, carmen
Macaronicum,'ll-in which Mr. Hay is made to sustain a prominent part. After
alluding to the zeal displayed in the matter by Sir James Hunter Blair, and
just at the moment that assent has been given to the measure by the Councillors
present, the Deacon is represented as bursting into the Council Chamber,
backed by a posse of anti-levellers, and in a harangue of most uncouth hexameters,
declaims against the project, and dares his brethren to carry it into
effect.
Mr. M'Dowall died December 1816, leaving six sons.
'
1 This mock-heroic poem was the joint production of the late Mr. Smellie, printer, and of Mr.
Little of Liberton. It will be found in " Kerr's Memoira of Smellie." ... his youngest son (Charles) the legal profession as a Writer to the Signet . In the back-ground the Lord ...

Book 8  p. 318
(Score 1.74)

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Book 8  p. 223
(Score 1.69)

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Book 9  p. 436
(Score 1.69)

344 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. .
shortly after, and recognising the shoes, brought one of them in his hand into
the hawing-room, and presenting it to another of the guests, Mr. John Bachan,
Writer to the Signet, who was of very diminutive stature, said to him-" Hae,
Johnny, there's a cradle for you to sleep in."
The personal history of Mr. Osborne affords few particulars either peculiar
or interesting. His father, Alexander Osborne, Esq., Comptroller of Customs at
Aberdeen, and who died there in 1785, was a gentleman of even greater dimensions
than his son.
After having filled an inferior appointment for some years at one of the outports,
Mr. Osborne obtained the office of Inspector-General and Solicitor of
Customs. He was subsequently appointed one of the Commissioners of the
Board ; and, latterly, on the reduction made in that establishment, retired upon
a superannuated allowance.
Mr. Osborne was never married ; and, being of frugal habits, he amassed a
considerable fortune, and made several landed purchases. Besides a pretty
extensive tract of land in Orkney, he was proprietor of a small estate in Ayrshire.
Gogar Bank, a few miles west of Edinburgh, belonged to him, where he
had a summer house, and a very extensive and excellent garden. Here he often
contemplated building a handsome villa, but the design was never carried into
execution.
Xlr. Osborne died about the year 1830, at the advanced age of seventy-four ;
and it is understood the bulk of his property was bequeathed to a gentleman of
the west country. He lived at one time in Richmond Street ; but latterly, and
for a considerable number of years, in York Place.
The small figure to the left represents the late MR. RONALDSON of the
Post Office. He was one of the least men of the regiment, but a very zealous
volunteer. He is placed in the same Print with Osborne, in order to record an
anecdote of Sergeant Gould. In forming a double from a single rank, at a
squad drill, Francis became Osborne's rear man. Poor Francis was never seen ;
and Gould, addressing the next man, continued to call out-" Move to the right,
sir ; why the devil don't you cover 1" Little Francis at length exclaimed, with
great na;ivet&'' I can't cover-I do all I can !"
Mr. Ronaldson was Surveyor of the General Post Office, which situation he
held for upwards of forty years. He was a most active, spirited little personage,
and remarkably correct in the management of his official department. He kept
a regular journal of his surveys, which, on his demise, was found to have been
brought up till within a few days of his death.
In private life, Ronaldson was exceedingly joyous, full of wit and anecdote,
and was withal a man of rare qualifications. He had also some claims to a
literary character. He was a votary of the muses, and a great collector of fugitive
pieces. He left upwards of two dozen volumes of Xcraps--culled principally
from newspapers-consisting of whatever seemed to him valuable or
curious. He was also deeply versed in divinity j and, strange as it may appear, ... it to another of the guests, Mr. John Bachan, Writer to the Signet , who was of very diminutive stature, ...

Book 8  p. 481
(Score 1.67)

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Book 9  p. 13
(Score 1.65)

E1 0 GRAPH I C AL 8 RE T C I3 E S. 205
No. LXXXV.
VOLTAIRE, THE FRENCH PHILOSOPHER,
AND
MR. WATSON, AN EDINBURGH MESSENGER.
THE remarkable similarity of physiognomy existing between the Philosopher
of Ferney and the humble Edinburgh Messenger was the cause of their heads
being etched in the present form. About the period of the execution of this
print, the Scottish capital was profuse in the display of odd characters j and
living portraitures' of some of the greatest men of the age were to be found
walking the streets of the city. In Miles M'Phail the caddy, Lord North
the British Prime Minister, might daily be seen shouldering a load of beef or
mutton; while, in the still more exact personification of old Watson the
Messenger, the noted Philosopher of France became a petty process-server and
a beagle of the law.
The likeness of the famous VOLTAIEE was copied by Kay from a painting
on the lid of a snuff-box belonging to John Davidson, Esq., Writer to the
Signet: with which the head of Mr. Watson was placed in contrast, that the
similarity, as well as any little difference of feature, might be more conspicuous.
A yery striking instance of the similar structure of faces is recorded in the Gallic Reports, in
the case of Martin Guerre and Arnauld de Filk. The latter, taking advantage of the absence of the
former, and having made himself master of the most minute circumstances of his life, through this
surprising resemblance, so imposed himself, not only on the relations of Martin Guerre, but even upon
his wife, that he was not suspected for several years; and when at length, from some untoward
circumstances, he fell under suspicion of being an impostor, he cheerfully submitted to a regular
prosecution, in which he behaved with such address, that, of near 150 witnesses examined on the
affair, between thirty and forty deposed that he was the true Martin Guerre, among whom were
Martin's four sisters and two of their husbands ; and of the remainder of the witnesses, sixty and
upwards declared the resemblance between the penons so strong that it was simply impossible to
affirm with certainty whether the accused was the true Martim or not. In short, Ainauld de Filk for
a long time puzzled the Parliament of Toulouse, even after the true Martin Guerre was returned, and
they appeared together face to face.
At the present day, almost 8 counterpart of Napoleon will be found in the penon of 8 celebrated
foreign musician, presently resident in Edinburgh. He is distinguished by the same peculiarity in
walking, his arms resting carelessly behind his back ; is of the same height, and the same cast of
features.
A few years ago, a young gentleman was taken up in London on about fourteen different charges
of swindling, and was brought to trial on what we would here term separate indictments. On one of
these he was convicted, but on the reat was acquitted ; having, although positively sworn to, proved
satisfactorily alibis in each of them. It turned out that the delinquencies had been perpetrated by
an individual, his complete counterpart. Of course he received 8 free pardon in the instance where
he had been convicted, and where he had been unable to prove an alibi.
Mr. Davidson obtained posseasion of the box while on a visit to Paris, where the likeness was
considered remarkably f a i t h f a ... 0 GRAPH I C AL 8 RE T C I3 E S. 205 No. LXXXV. VOLTAIRE, THE FRENCH PHILOSOPHER, AND MR. WATSON, AN ...

Book 8  p. 289
(Score 1.65)

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Book 9  p. 421
(Score 1.65)

Parliament House.] THE COLLEGE OF JUSTICE. -
a vote among themselves in favour of that protest,
declaring it to be founded on the laws of the realm,
for which they were prosecuted before Parliament,
and sharply reprimanded, a circumstance which
gave great offence to the nation..
The affairs ot the Faculty are managed by a
Dean, or President, a Treasurer, Clerk, and selected
Council ; and, besides the usual branches
of a liberal education, those who are admitted
.as advocates must have gone through a regular
course of civil and Scottish law.
Connected with the Court of Session is the
Society of Clerks, or Writers to the Royal Signet,
whose business it is to subscribe the writs that
pass under that signet in Scotland, and practise as
attorneys before the Courts of Session, Justiciary,
and the Jury Court The office of Keeper of the
Signet is a lucrative one, but is performed by a
deputy. The qualifications for admission to this
body are an apprenticeship for five years with one of
the members, after two years? attendance at the University,
and on a course of lectures on conveyancing
given by a lecturer appointed by the Society, and
also on the Scottish law class in the University.
Besides these Writers to the Signet, who enjoy
the right of conducting exclusively certain branches
.of legal procedure, there is another, but? inferior,
society of practitioners, who act as attorneys before
the various Courts, in which they were of long
standing, but were only incorporated in 1797, under
the title of Solicitors before the Supreme Courts,
The Judges of the Courts of Session and Justiciary,
with members of these before-mentioned
corporate bodies, and the officers of Court, form
the College of Justice instituted by James V., and
of which the Judges of the Court of Session enjoy
the title of Senators.
The halls for the administration of justice immediately
adjoin the Parliament House. The Court
af Session is divided into what are nanied the
Outer and Inner Houses. The former consists of
five judges, or Lords Ordinary, occupying separate
Courts, where cases are heard for the first time;
tbe latter comprises two Courts, technically known
.as the First and Second Divisions. Four Judges
sit in each of these, and it is before them that
litigants, if dissatisfied with the Outer House decision,
may bring their cases for final judgment,
unless .afterwards they indulge in the expensive
luxury of appealing to the House of Lords.
The Courts of the Lords Ordinary enter from
the corridor at the south end of the great hall, and
Those of the Inner House from a long lobby on the
east side of it.
Although the .College of Justice was instituted
by James V., and held its first sederunt in the
old Tolbooth on the 27th of May, 1532, it
was first projected by his uncle, the Regent-
Duke of Albany. The Court originally consisted
of the Lord Chancellor, the Lord President,
fourteen Lords Ordinary, or Senators (one-half
clergy and one-half laity), and afterwards an indefinite
number of supernumerary judges, designated
Extraordinary Lords. The annual expenses of
this Court were defrayed from the revenues of
the clergy, who bitterly, but vainly, remonstrated
against this taxation. It may not be uninteresting
to give here the names of the first members of the
Supreme Judicature :-
Alexander, Abbot of Cambuskenneth, Lord
President ; Richard Bothwell, Rector of Askirk
(whose father was Provost .of Edinburgh in the
time of James 111,); John Dingwall, Provost of
the Trinity Church; Henry White, Dean of
Brechin ; William Gibson, Dean of Restalrig ;
Thomas Hay, Dean of Dunbar; Robert Reid,
Abbot of Kinloss ; George Kerr, Provost of
Dunglass ; Sir William Scott of Balwearie ; Sir
John Campbell of Lundie ; Sir James Colville
of Easter Wemyss; Sir Adam Otterburne of
Auldhame ; Nicolas Crawford. of Oxengangs ; Sir
Francis Bothwell (who was provost of the city
in 1535); and James Lawson of the Highriggs.
The memoirs which have been preserved of
the administration of justice by the Court of
Session in the olden time are not much to its
honour. The arbitrary nature of it is referred to
by Buchanan, and in the time of James VI. we
find the Lord Chancellor, Sir Alexander Seaton
(Lord Fyvie in 1598), superintending the lawsuits
of a friend, and instructing him in the mode and
manner in which they should be conducted. But
Scott of Scotstarvit gives us a sorry account of
this peer, who owed his preferment to Anne of
Denmark. The strongest proof of the corrupt
nature of the Court is given us by the -4ct passed
by the sixth parliament of. James VI., in 1579,
by which the Lords were prohibited, ? No uther be
thamselves, or be their wives, or servantes, to take
in ony times cumming, bud, bribe, gudes, or geir,
fra quhat-sum-ever person or persones presently
havand, or that hereafter sal1 happen to have
ony actions or causes persewed before them,?
under pain of confiscation (Glendoick?s Acts, fol.).
The necessity for this law plainly evinws that
the secret acceptance of bribes must have been
common among the judges of the time; while,
in other instances, the warlike spirit of the people
paralysed the powers of the Court.
When a noble, or chief of rank, was summoned tu ... House.] THE COLLEGE OF JUSTICE. - a vote among themselves in favour of that protest, declaring it to ...

Book 1  p. 167
(Score 1.63)

438 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
estimation in which his character was held. In 1812 he received the additional
appointment of Solicitor of Teinds.
Mr. M'Cormick was remarkable for benevolence of disposition, gentlemanly
appearance, and deportment. He married, on the 6th April 1786, Miss Joanna
Hamilton of Grange (Ayrshire), by whom he had four sons and two daughters.
His eldest son, Samuel, after serving some time as an Advocate-Depute, was
promoted to the Sheriffship of Bute, which office he held until his death, which
occurred in 1834. Another son was a lieutenant in the East India Company's
service, and died at the age of twenty. His two daughters only survived.
V.-GEORGE CRANSTOUN, afterwards LORD COREROUSE. This admirable
judge was a son of the Hon. George Cranstoun of Longworton. He was
originally designed for the military profession. He passed advocate in 179 3 ;
was appointed one of the Depute-Advocates in 1805 ; chosen Dean of Faculty
in 1823 ; and elevated to the bench, on the death of Lord Hermand, in 1826,
from which he retired in 1839, and was succeeded by Lord Murray.
His lordship is known as the author of the "Diamond Beetle Case," an
amusing but not overcharged caricature of the judicial style of several judges of
a bygone era. An excellent Greek scholar, Mr. Cranstoun, on that account, was
a great favourite with Lord Monboddo, who used to declare that " Cranstoun
was the only scholar in all Scotland!" The scholars, in Lord Monboddo's
opinion, being all on the other side of the Tweed.
While on the bench Lord Corehouse was the beau-ideal of a judge ; placid
and calm, he listened with patience to the long-winded orations which it was too
often his fate to hear, although he endeavoured as much as he could, with
propriety, to keep counsel to the proper merits of their case. A first-rate lawyer,
especially in all feudal questions, his opinions were uniformly listened to with
the deepest respect.
VI.-JOHN CLERK, afterwards LORD ELDIN. This well-known and able
lawyer was the eldest son of John Clerk, Esq. of Eldin, sixth son of Sir John
Clerk of Penicuik, and author of a celebrated work on Naval Tactics. He
was born in April 1757, and educated with the view of proceeding to India;
but the expectations of his friends having been disappointed by the occurrence
of certain political changes, his attention was turned to the legal profession.
After completing his apprenticeship as a Writer to the Signet, and having
practised for a year or two as an accountant, he qualified himself for the bar,
and was admitted a member of the Faculty of Advocates in 1785.
Possessed of the most promising intellectual requisites, Mr. Clerk speedily
rose to distinction ; and it is said that at one period he had nearly one-half of
all the business of the Court upon his hands. His style of pleading was
" distinguished by strong sense, acuteness, and the most profound reasoning,
His sole object being to convince, his mode of stating the argument was brief,
simple, and clear. His eloquence was a constant appeal to legal reason, in the
masterly exposition of which thewhole collected force of his intellect was displayed. ... turned to the legal profession. After completing his apprenticeship as a Writer to the Signet , and ...

Book 9  p. 587
(Score 1.62)

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Book 9  p. 564
(Score 1.6)

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Book 9  p. 618
(Score 1.59)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 465
changes were effected in the forms of process j and the Jury Court, as a separate
judicature, was abolished. Mi. Bell was appointed one of the Principal Clerks
of Session in 1831, in the place of Sir Walter Scott. In 1833 he waa called
upon to act as chairman of the Royal Commission to examine into the state of
the Law in general. He died 33d September 1843.
VI1.-WILLIAM ROSE ROBINSON, of Clermiston, in the county of
Edinburgh, late Sheriff of Lanark, passed advocate in 1804. His father,
George Robertson of Clermiston, was a Writer to the Signet. Prior to his
being appointed to the office of Sheriff; which compelled his residence in the
west country, Mr. Robinson had very good practice as an advocate. He married,
8th April 1811, Mary, second daughter of James Douglas, Esq., of Orchyarton,
by whom he left several children. He died in 1834, and was succeeded
as Sheriff of Lanark by Archibald Alison, Esq.
VIIL-JOHN WRIGHT, lecturer on law-formerly noticed (vol. I. p, 268).
1X.-JOHN GRAHAM DALYELL, afterwards SIR J. G. DALYELKLn, ight
and Baronet, the author of a valuable work on the Early Superstitions of Scotland,
was born in 1778, and admitted advocate in 1797. He was the second
son of the late Sir Robert Dalyell, fourth Bart. of Binns, Linlithgo-wshire, by
Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Nicol Graham, Esq., of Gartmore, and early in
life distinguished himself by the publication of various works illustrative of the
history and poetry of his native country ; amongst which may be enumerated
Fragments of Scottish History, 4to ; Scottish Poems of the Sixteenth Century,
2 vols., 12mo ; an edition of Richard Bannatyne's valuable Memorials, 8vo ;
and various tracts on the Chartularies of Ancient Religious Houses in Scotland.
He was also deeply versed in natural history, and gave to the world Dissertations
on the Propagation of Zoophytes ; the History of the Genus Planaria ;
and an edition of Spallanzani's Tracts, in 2 vols. 8170. He was successively
President of the Society for encouraging the Useful Arts in Scotland, Vice-President
of the Society of Antiquaries, and one of the representatives of the Fourth
District in the Town-Council of Edinburgh. In the year 1837 the honour of
knighthood was conferred, by letters patent under the Great Sed, for his
attainments in literature. He succeeded his brother as sixth Baronet in 1841,
and died 7th June 1 85 1.
X.-FRANCIS JEFFREY, afterwards LORD JEFFREY.
a biographical sketch, of his lordship have already appeared
A Portrait, with
XI.-JOHN JARDINE passed advocate in 1799. He was the only son of
the late George Jardine, who was for upwards of fifty years a distinguished
Professor in the University of Glasgow, and who introduced that system of
practical discipline in the Philosophy Classes, for which that seminary has been
since so much distinguished, and which is fully explained by the Professor in
VOL. II. 30 ... 1804. His father, George Robertson of Clermiston, was a Writer to the Signet . Prior to his being appointed to ...

Book 9  p. 620
(Score 1.59)

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Book 9  p. 608
(Score 1.58)

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Book 9  p. 595
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Book 9  p. 409
(Score 1.57)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 75
his neck. He had, however, contracted (which the Print does give) an inveterate
habit of stooping, which was rather injurious to his general aspect. In
convivial society, especially when at the head of his own hospitable table, he was
much disposed to be jocular, and was liberal of his store of pithy sayings and
droll stories. In particular, he highly enjoyed the meetings of the well-known
Poker Club, of which he was a member, along with his brother, and to which
belonged at that time, Patrick Lord Elibank, Lord Ellioch, Dr. Adam Smith,
Drs. Cullen, Black, and Gregory, Dr. Adam Fergusson, Old Ambassador Keith,
Sir Gilbert Elliot, and many others ; some of them men of letters, others, persons
of high birth, or eminent in public life.
John Home was extremely regular and methodical in all his habits, punctual
to his time in whatever he had to do, and not very tolerant with those who
failed in this (as he rightly thought it) important article. It could not be truly
affirmed that he was of an equally calm and placid temperament as his brother,
the philosopher ; but the brothers entertained the most cordial affection for each
other, and continued in constant habits of kind intercourse and mutual good
offices to the end of their lives. Under the historian's will, the principal part
of his effects went to his brother, who survived him.
John Home died at Ninewells, on the 14th of November 1786, after a short
illness, and in great composure of mind. He was interred in the family vault,
under his parish church at Chirnside. He had always been on friendly terms
with the good and worthy pastor of that parish, Dr. Walter Anderson, whom
indeed no one could dislike, who valued simplicity and mildness of character,
or felt the importance of the due discharge of all the duties of that holy office.
By his marriage to Agnes Carre, John Home, who survived her, had eight
children, of whom three sons, .Joseph, David, and John, and two daughters,
Catherine and Agnes, survived him.' Joseph, when a young man, served as
Captain in the Queen's Bays or 2d Dragoon Guards. He afterwards resided as
a country gentleman, at Ninewells, where he died on the 14th of February 1832,
unmarried, and at the advanced age of eighty-one. David was an advocate at
the Scottish bar, and held successively the offices of Sheriff-Depute of Berwickshire,
Sheriff-Depute of West Lothian, Professor of the Law of Scotland in the
University of Edinburgh, one of the Principal Clerks to the Court of Session,
and one of the Barons of the Court of Exchequer for Scotland; from which
office he retired, on the statutory allowance, in February 1834. John was a
man of great worth and good parts j and nature had gifted him with no small
share of genuine pleasantry and humour, which were combined with a generous
and an affectionate disposition. In the earlier part of his life, he did business
with much credit, in Edinburgh, as a Writer to the Signet. In his latter years
he gave up practice there, and took up his residence at Ninewells, with his
eldest brother, the laird, who committed to him the chief or rather the entire
charge of the management of his affairs, and the improvement of his estate.
They carried into execution sundry judicious projects of draining, enclosure, and
"he other three children, namely, Robed, Helen, and Agatha, died in infancy or early youth. ... he did business with much credit, in Edinburgh, as a Writer to the Signet . In his latter years he gave up ...

Book 9  p. 99
(Score 1.53)

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Book 8  p. 280
(Score 1.51)

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Book 9  p. 94
(Score 1.51)

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