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Book 9  p. 319
(Score 1.32)

Calton Hill.] THE HIGH SCHOOL. IT1
ture, including reading, orthography, recitation,
grammar, and composition, together with British
history, forms the prominent parts of the system ;
while the entire curriculum of study-which occupies
six years-embraces the Latin, Greek, French,
and German languages, history, geography, physiology,
chemistry, natural philosophy, zoology,
botany, algebra, geometry, drawing, fencing,
gymnastics, and military drill. In the library are
same form, each possessing no advantage over his
schoolfellow. ?? Edinburgh has reason to be proud
of this noble institution,? said Lord Provost
Black at the examination in 1845, ?as one which
has conferred a lustre upon our city, and which has
given a tone to the manners and intellect of its
Whether they remain in Edinburgh
or betake themselves to other lands, and whatever
be the walk of life in which they are led, I believe
I inhabitants.
all4ikelihood never will be.
In the long roll of its scholars are the names
of the most distinguished men of all professions,
and in every branch of science and literature,
many of whom have helped to form and consolidate
British India. It also includes three natives
of Edinburgh, High School callants,? who have
been Lord Chancellors of Great Britain-Wedderburn,
Erskine, and Brougham.
The annual examinations always take place in
presence of the Lord Provost and magistrates, a
number of the city clergy and gentlemen connected
with the other numerous educational establishments
in the city. There is also a large concourse of the
parents and friends of the pupils. The citizens have
ever rejoiced in this ancient school, and are justly
proud of it, not only for the prominent position it
occupies, but from the peculiarity of its constitumanity.
Dr. Carson held the office till October,
1845, when feeble health compelled him to resign,
and he was succeeded by Dr. Leonhard
Schmitz (as twenty-sixth Rector, from D. Vocat,
Rector in 151g), the first foreigner who ever held L
classical mastership in the High School. He was a
graduate of the University of Bonn, and a native
of Eupen, in Rhenish Prussia. He was the author
of a continuation of Niebuhr?s ?History of
Rome,? in three volumes, and many other works,
and in 1844 obtained from his native monarch
the gold medal for literature, awarded ?as a mark
of his Majesty?s sense of the honour thereby conferred
on the memory of Niebuhr, one of the
greatest scholars of Germany.? In 1859 he was
selected by her Majesty the Queen to give a
course of historical study to H.R.H. the Prince
, of Wales, and during the winter of 1862-3, he ... Hill.] THE HIGH SCHOOL. IT1 ture, including reading, orthography, recitation, grammar, and composition, ...

Book 3  p. 111
(Score 1.32)

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Book 8  p. 432
(Score 1.28)

196 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
No. LXXXI.
THE EARL OF HOPETOUN,
WITH A DISTANT VIEW OF THE HOPETOUN FENCIBLES.
THE immediate ancestor of the Earls of Hopetoun was Henry Hope, a merchant
of considerable extent in Edinburgh, who married Jacquiline de Tott,
a French lady, by whom he had two sons. The eldest, Thomas, was bred
a lawyer ; and, by his eminent talents, obtained great practice and amassed a
considerable fortune, with which he made extensive landed purchases. He was
appointed Lord Advocate by. James VI., and created a Baronet in 1628. His
grandson, Charles, was the first Earl of Hopetoun. Henry, the second son, went
to Amsterdam, and was the ancestor of that opulent branch of the family long
settled there.
He entered
the army when very young, and held an ensign's commission in the 3d Regiment
of Foot Guards. He was with the troops in Germany ; and, when only eighteen
years of age, was engaged at the memorable battle of Minden, in 1759, where
the British infantry signally distinguished themselves. He continued in the same
regiment till 1764, when he retired from the army, in consequence of the ill
health of his elder brother, Lord Hope, with whom he travelled some time on
the Continent, but without producing any beneficial change in the state of his
health, and who died in 1766. On the death of his father, in 1781, he succeeded
to the earldom, and was chosen one of the sixteen representative Peers
of Scotland at the general election in 1784. The Earl took an active part in all
political questions, and continued to sit in the House of Lords during a great
many succeeding years.
On the death of his grand-uncle, the third Marquis of Annandale, in 1792,
Lord Hopetoun succeeded to the large estates of that nobleman, on which occasion
he added the surname of Johnstone to his own. On the breaking out of the
French war in 1793, when seven regiments of fencibles were directed by his
Majesty to be raised in Scotland, the Earl, who was firmly and sincerely
attached to the British Constitution, stood forward in defence of his country,
and embodied a corps called the Southern or Hopetoun Fencibles, of which he
was appointed Colonel. The officers belonging to this regiment were men of
the first rank and respectability : Lord Napier was Lieutenant-colonel ; the
veteran Clarkson, Major ; the Earl of Home, Captain of Grenadiers ; Mr.
Bailie of Mellerstain, and Mr. M'Lean of Ardgower, Captains, etc. etc. The
Earl assiduously attended to his military duties, and soon brought the discipline
of the corps to great perfection.
While the regiment was stationed at Dalkeith, several attempts were made
JAMBthSir,d Earl, the subject of this sketch, was born in 1741. ... BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. No. LXXXI. THE EARL OF HOPETOUN, WITH A DISTANT VIEW OF THE HOPETOUN FENCIBLES. THE ...

Book 8  p. 275
(Score 1.27)

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Book 8  p. 129
(Score 1.27)

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Book 9  p. 594
(Score 1.23)

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Book 9  p. 462
(Score 1.22)

308 OLD AKD NEW EDINBURGH. [Arthur's Scat.
sey, and a deep excitement prevailed, when it was
whispered-none knew how-that they were under
secret orders for the distant East Indies-in other
words, that they had been SOU to the East India
Company by the Government, and that, worse than
the authorities basely having an idea that the poor
clansmen of Kintail "were ignorant, unable to comprehend
the nature of their stipulations, and incapable
of demanding redress for any breach of trust."
But the Seaforth men were neither so ignorant
all, they had been sold by their officers and by the
chief, whom they had looked upon as a father and
leader.
All their native jealousy and distrust of the
Saxon was now kindled and strengthened by their
love of home. General David Stewart, in his
'' Sketches of the Highlanders," boldly asserts that
the regiment was secretly under orders for India,
nor so confiding as the Government supposed, and
they were determined at all hazards not to submit
to the least infraction of the terms on which they
were enlisted as Fencible Infantry-limited service
and within the British Isles ; and when the day for
embarkation came, the zznd September, their longsmothered
wrath could no longer be hidden.
" The regiment paraded on the Castle hill, and ... OLD AKD NEW EDINBURGH. [Arthur's Scat. sey, and a deep excitement prevailed, when it was whispered-none knew ...

Book 4  p. 308
(Score 1.22)

I00
THE Calton Hill, till the erection of the Regent
Bridge, was isolated from the line of Princes
Street, and rises to the altitude of 355 feet above
the level of the sea, presenting an abrupt and
rocky face to the south-west, and descending in
other directions by rapid but not untraversable
declivities. ?Calton, or Caldoun, is admitted to
be a hill covered with bushes,? according to
Dalrymple?s 6?Annals?; but with reference to the
OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH.
forest of Drumsheugh, by which it was once
surrounded, it ,is more likely to be Choille-dun.
In the oldest views we possess of it, the hill is
always represented bare, and denuded of all trees
and bushes, and one lofty knoll on the south was
long known as the Miller?s Knowe. In some of
the earlier notices of this hill, it is called the
Dow Craig. The Gaelic Dhu, or Black Craig, is
very appropriate for this lofty mass of trap rock,
[Calton HilL
by the railway terminus and Waverley Bridge. The
former extends eastward under the North Bridge,
and occupies a great space, including the sites on
which stood old streets, two churches, and two
hospitals, wkich we have already described, a
public market, and -superseding the original
termini, but retaining some of the works pertaining
to the Edinburgh and Glasgow, the North
British, and the Edinburgh, Perth, and Dundee
Railways. Between 1869 and 1873 it underwent
extensive reconstruction and much enlargement.
It has a pedestrian access, about twelve feet wide,
from the north-east corner of the Green Market,
and a spacious carriage-way round the western
side of that market and from the Old Town by the
Waverley Bridge, and serves for the entire North
British system, with pleasant and sheltered accommodation
for the arrival and departure of trains.
The site of the Little Mound we have referred
to is now occupied by the Waverley Bridge, which,
after. striking rectangularly from Princes Street,
about 270 yards westward of the new post office,
crosses the vale of the old loch, southward to the
foot of Cockburn Street. The bridge was originally
a stone railway structure, consisting of
several arches that spanned the Edinburgh and
Glasgow lines, and afforded carriage access to all
the three original termini. Proving unsuitable for
the increased requirements of the station, it was
in 1870-3 replaced by a handsome iron skew
bridge, in three reaches, that are respectively 3 10,
293, and 276 feet in length, with 48 feet of a
carriage-way and 22 feet of footpaths.
The Green Market, which lies immediately westward
of the block of houses at the west side of the
North Bridge, occupies, or rather covers, the
original terminus of the Edinburgh, Perth, and
Dundee Railway, and was formed and opened on
the 6th March, 1868, in lieu of the previous
market at the eastern end of the valley, removed
by the North British Railway. It stands on a
basement of lofty arches, constructed of strength
sufficient to bear the weight of such a peculiar
edifice. It was covered by an ornamental terraced
roof, laid out in tastefully-arranged gardens, level
with Princes Street, and having well lights and
a gallery; changes, however, were. effected in
1877, when it was to suffer encroachment on
its roof by the street improvements, and when
it received a further ornamentation of the former,
and acquired at its north-west corner a handsome
staircase. In the spacious area of this
edifice, promenade concerts, cattle and flower
shows, are held.
The East Princes Street Gardens, which extend
from the Waverley Bridge to the east side of the
Mound, after being, as we have said, a nursery,
were first laid out in 1830, and after suffering some
mutilation and curtailment by the formation of the
Edinburgh and Glasgow Railway, w2;?e re-formed
and ornamented anew in 1849-50, at the expense
of about £4,500.
The high graduated banks with terraced walks
descend to a deep central hollow, and comprise
within their somewhat limited space a pleasant
variety of promenade and garden ground. ... Calton Hill, till the erection of the Regent Bridge, was isolated from the line of Princes Street, and ...

Book 3  p. 100
(Score 1.22)

310 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
At Sydney they were treated by Governor Hunter (a Scotsman) with all the
humanity in his power. Here Muir purchased a piece of land, and busied himself
in its improvement; while in the society of his exiled companions, he
enjoyed as much happiness as the peculiarity of his situation would permit.
After remaining in the " distant land of exile " nearly two years, he found means
to escape in an American vessel (the Otter) which had been fitted out at New
York by some individuals, for the purpose of aiding him in his escape, and
which had anchored at Sydney for the ostensible purpose of taking in wood
and water, With the Otter he sailed for the United States; but, unfortunately,
having occasion to touch at Nootka Sound, he found that a British sloopof-
war had unexpectedly arrived a short time before ; and as this vessel had only
left Sydney a day or two previous to the Otter, Muir deemed it prudent to go
on shore-preferring to travel over the whole American continent to the risk
of detection.
After many hardships he at length found a passage on board a Spanish
frigate bound for Cadiz; but Spain being then leagued with the Republic
of France, on arriving off the port of Cadiz, the frigate was ittacked by a
British man-of-war, A desperate engagement ensued, in which Muir is said to
have fought with great bravery, and was severely wounded. On the surrender
of the frigate he was concealed on board for six days, and then sent on
shore with the other wounded prisoners. In a letter from Cadiz, dated 14th
August 1797, he thus describes his situation :-" Contrary to my expectation,
I am at last nearly cured of my numerous wounds. The Directory have shown
me great kindness. Their solicitude for an unfortunate being, who has been
so cruelly oppressed, is a balm of consolation which revives my drooping spirits.
The Spaniards detain me as a prisoner, because I am a Scotsman ; but I have
" And oh, my Moffat ! whither shall I roam ?
Flow, flow, ye tears ! perhaps the funeral bier ;
No-flourish Hope-from thee I ask a home,-
Thy gentle hand shall wipe an exile's tear.
" Yes, we shall weep o'er each lamented grave
Of those who joined us in stern Freedom's cause ;
These tears shall Freedom honour with applause.
And, as the moisten'd turf our tears shall lave,
" I soon shall join the dim aerial band,-
This stream of life has little time to flow.
Should close-enough-'tis all I ask below.
Oh ! if my dying eyes thy soothing hand
" This little relic, Moffat, I bequeath
While life remains, of friendship, just and pnre,-
This little pledge of love, surviving death,
Friendship immortal, and re-union aure.
" THOMASM UIR"
Mr. William Moffat, to whom this flattering mark of esteem is addressed, resided in Edinburgh.
He w89 admitted a Solicitor in 1791, and wa5 the legal agent of Mr. Muir. His son, Mr. Thomas
Muir Moffat, is named after the Reformer. ... BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. At Sydney they were treated by Governor Hunter (a Scotsman) with all the humanity in ...

Book 8  p. 434
(Score 1.2)

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Book 9  p. 431
(Score 1.2)

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Book 8  p. 172
(Score 1.2)

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Book 8  p. 155
(Score 1.19)

2 1 9 Fountainbridge.] INDIA-RUBBER COMPANY.
flesher would venture to kill any beast till all the
different parts were bespoke, butcher meat being
then a very unsaleable article.?
At the southern extremity of Fountainbridge
stood, till within the last few years, an antique villa,
a little way back from the road, named Bainfield,
for years the residence of an old and well-known
citizen, Bain Whyt, a W.S. of I 789, who was senior
lieutenant and afterwards adjutant of the First
Edinburgh Volunteers formed in 1794, and who
is still remembered in Edinburgh as the founder
of the Wagering Club in 1775. Yearly, on the
night of the 30th January, the members of this
club meet and solemnly drink to the memory
of ?? Old Bain Whyt,? in whose honour songs are
occasionally sung, the character of which may be
gathered from the following two verses of one sung
at the ninetieth anniversary :-
?? Come all ye jolly wagerers, and listen unto me,
And I will sing a little song, composed in memorie
Of the fine old Scottish gentleman, who in 1775,
Did plant the tree that still we see, right hearty and
alive.
Chorus-Right hearty and alive,
In this its ninetieth year !
With mirth and hearty cheer !
?Ihen drink to-night, to old Bain Whyt,
6? When haughty Gaul did fiercely crow and threaten swcird
Bain Whyt among the foremost rose to guard our native
A soldier good, full armed he stood, for home and
The pattern of a Ioyal man, a British volunteer !
in hand,
land ;
country dear,
Chorus-A British volunteer,
And an adjutant was he !
To him with three times three ! ?
Then fill the cup, and quaff it up,
The wagers, for small sums, a bottle of wine, a
dinner, perhaps, are made on the probable course
of current public events. They are then noted and
sealed up, to be opened and read from the chair
that night twelvemonth-the club holding no meetings
in the interim ; and the actual results are often
so far wide of all human speculation as to excite
both amusement and interest.
North of Bainfield, in what is still called Gilmore
Park, are two of the largest and finest manufactories
of India-rubber in the world, and the operations
conducted therein illustrate most ably the
nature and capabilities of caoutchouc. They stand
near each other on the western bank of the Union
Canal, and belong respectively to the North British
Rubber Company, and the Scottish Vulcanite
Company.
In 1855 an enterprising American brought to
Edinburgh the necessary capital and machinery
for an India-rubber manufactory, and acquired
possession of a great quadrangular block of fine
buildings, known as the Castle Silk Mills, which
had long been vacant, the projectors having failed
in their expectations. This edifice consists of two
large blocks of five floors each, with a number of
adjacent buildings.
Here the India-rubber arrives in different forms,
according to the fashion of the countries that produce
it, some shaped like quaint bottles, and some
in balls, of five inches diameter, and it is carefully
examined with a view to the detection of foreign
substances before it is subjected to the processes of
manufacture. After being softened in hot water,
the balls are crushed into thin pieces between
cylinders, the rubber being sent through and
through again and again, until it is thoroughly
crushed and assumes the form of a web. If further
reduction is necessary, it is sent through a third
set of rollers, and to rid it completely of foreign
matter, leaves or bark, &c., washing and cleansing
machines are employed. So adhesive is its nature,
that cleansing would prove abortive in a dry state,
and consequently jets of water flow constantly on
the rubber and cylinders when the machines referred
to are in operation. After being thus
cleansed, the webs are hung in the warm atmosphere
of the drying-room for several weeks.
From thence they are taken to ?? the mill,? which
occupies two entire floors of the main building.
The grinding machines; to the operation af which
the rubber is subjected, consist of two cylinders,
one of which is moderately heated by steam, and
the webs formed by the washing-machines are kept
revolving round and round the cylinders, until the
material becomes quite plastic. At this stage, sulphur,
or other chemical substances, are incorporated
with it, to determinate its ultimate character, and it
is then made up into seven or eight pound rolls,
while all further treatment depends upon the purpose
to which it is to be applied.
Great is the variety of goods produced here.
One of the upper floors is occupied by shoemakers
alone. There boots and shoes of all sizes are
made, but more especially the goloshes for wearing
over them; another floor is occupied by the makers
of coats, leggings, cushions, bags, and so forth. The ?
light-coloured coats foi India are the finest articles
made here.
The North British Rubber Company have paid
much attention to that department which includes
the manufacture of mbes, springs, washers, drivingbelts,
tires for wheels, &c They made the latter
for the wheels of the road steamer invented by
Rfr. R W. Thomson, of Edinburgh-huge rings of ... 1 9 Fountainbridge.] INDIA-RUBBER COMPANY. flesher would venture to kill any beast till all the different parts ...

Book 4  p. 219
(Score 1.17)

High Street.] THE BRITISH LINEN COMPANY. 279
resided here was John, fourth Marquis, who was
Secretary of State for Scotland from 1742 till 1745,
when he resigned the office, on which the Government
at once availed themselves of the opportunity
for leaving it vacant, as it has remained ever since.
He died in 1762, and soon after the carriageentrance
and the fine old terraced garden of the
house, which lay on the slope westward, were
removed to make way for the Episcopal church in
the Cowgate-doomed in turn to be forsaken by
its founders, and even by their successors.
From the Tmeeddale family the mansion passed
into the hands of the British Linen Company, and
became their banking house, until they deserted it
for Moray House in the Canongate, from which they
ultiniatelymigrated to a statelier edifice inSt. Andrew
Square. This company was originally incorpo-
Tated by a charter under the Privy Seal granted by
George 11. on the 6th of July, 1746, at a time
when the mind of the Scottish people was still
agitated by the events of the preceding year and
the result of the battle of Culloden; and it was
deemed an object of the first importance to tranquillise
the country and call forth its resources, so
that the attention of the nation should be directed
to the advantages of trade and manufacture. With
this view the Government, as well as many gentlemen
of rank and fortune, exerted themselves to
promote the linen manufacture, which had been
lately introduced, deeming that it would in time
become the staple manufacture of Scotland, and
provide ample employment for her people, while
.extensive markets for the produce of their labour
would be found alike at home and in the colonies,
then chiefly supplied by the linens of Germany.
By the Dukes of Queensberry and Argyle, who
became the first governors of the British Linen
Company, representations to this effect were made
to Government, and by the Earls of Glencairn, Eglinton,
Galloway, Panmure, and many other peers,
together with the Lord Justice Clerk Fletcher of
Saltoun, afterwards Lord Milton, who was the first
deputy governor, and whose mother, when an exile
in Holland during the troubles, had secretly obtained
a knowledge of the art of weaving and of
dressidg the fine linen known as ? Holland,? and
introduced its manufacture at the village of Saltoun;
by the Lord Justice Clerk Alva ; Provost George
Drummond ; John Coutts, founder of the famous
banking houses of Forbes and Co., and Coutts
and Co. in the Strand; by Henry Home, Lord
Kames ; and many othqs, all of whom urged the
establishment of the company, under royal sanction,
and offered to become subscribers to the undertaking.
A charter was obtained in accordance with their
views and wishes, establishing the British Linen
Company as a corporation, and bestowing upon
it ample privileges, not only to manufacture and
deal in linen fabrics, but also to do all that
might conduce to the promotion thereof; and
authority was given to raise a capital of ~roo,ooo,
to be enlarged by future warrants under the
sign manual of his Majesty, his heirs and successors,
to such sums as the affairs of the company
might .require. After this the company engaged to
a considerable extent in the importation of flax and
the manufacture of yarns and linens, having warehouses
both in Edinburgh and London, and in its
affairs none took a more active part than Lord
Milton, who was an enthusiast in all that related to
the improvement of trade, agriculture, and learning,
in his native country; but it soon became apparent
that the company ? would be of more utility, and
better promote the objects of their institution, by
enlarging the issue of their notes to traders, than
being traders and manufacturers themselves.?
By degrees, therefore, the company withdrew
from all manufacturing operations and speculations,
and finally closed them in 1763, from which year
to the present time their business has been confined
to the discount of bills, advances on accounts,
and other b.ank transactions, in support of Scottish
trade generally, at home and abroad. ?By the
extension of their branch agencies to a great number
of towns,? to quote their own historical report, ? and
the employment in discounts and cash advaqces of
their own funds, as well as of that portion of the
formerly scanty and inactive money capital of Scotland
which has been lodged with the company, they
have been the means of contributing very materially
to the encouragement of useful industry throughout
Scotland, and to her rapid progress in agricultural
and mechanical improvements, and in commercial
intercourse with foreign countries. As regards the
particular object of the institution of the companythe
encouragement of the linen manufa.cture-considerably
more than half of the flax and hemp
imported into the United Kingdom, is now (in
1878) brought to the Scottish ports.?
Now the bank has nearly eighty branch or subbranch
offices over all Scotland alone. The company?s
original capital of AIOO,OOO has been
gradually increased under three additional charters,
granted at different times, under the Great Seal
By Queen Victoria, their fourth charter, dated 19th
March, 1849, ratifies and confirms all, their privileges
and rights, and power was given to augment
their capital to any sum not exceeding A r,5oo,ooo
in all, for banking purposes. The amount of new ... Street.] THE BRITISH LINEN COMPANY. 279 resided here was John, fourth Marquis, who was Secretary of State ...

Book 2  p. 279
(Score 1.17)

470 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.
the head, and was styled the Provost's Officer, it being his chief duty to wait
upon that civic dignitary. This with hini was truly a labour of love ; and indeed
towards all the Magistrates his civility and attention were unremitting.
Whatever occurred of a public nature, during their absence, was sure to be made
known to them by a note in the hand-writing of this devoted servant, at all
hours of the day, and frequently before they had risen out of bed. He was a
steady advocate for giving honour to whom honour was due ; and whoever happened
to be in office for the time was with him a most especial object of respect.
In his eyes the reigning Lord Provost was the greatest man upon earth. Nor
did this enthusiastic feeling originate in any slavish or mercenary motive-it
owed its existence solely to his innate desire to fulfil to the uttermost his humble,
but highly useful and honourable duties. If he happened to meet two of his
mastcrs together, his salutation of " Gentlemen-both," with a strong emphasis
on the latter word, seemed to imply that he reckoned no one but a Magistrate
fully entitled to that appellation. The dialect of his native-mountains never
entirely lcft poor Archie, who was a sad murderer of the King's English ;
and his ludicrous mistakes and mispronunciations of words mere a source of
infinite amusement at the Council Board. At the fencing of the Magistrates'
Court, after -an election, when he had to repeat 'after the clerk certain Latin
words, his mode of doing so was extremely characteristic and amusing. For
instance, when he came to the legal phrase " in. statu quo," he pronounced it
with a sonorous emphasis thus :-$' In stutter quoh."'
When the Lord Provost or any of his brethren were called on public business
to London, Archie, and none but he, was their faithful satellite ; and if
any Scotsman happened to inquire at their hotel for admission to speak with
these functionaries, Archie's kindly feelings towards his countrymen, rendered
more acute by his distance from home, broke out into most exuberant welcome,
while he 'would address the applicant thus :-" Ou ay, sir, walk in; ta Lord
Provost and Bailies, and a' the Council's here. They'll be unco glad to see
Besides his situation of City Officer, Archie held numerous subordinate
appointments. He was officer to-the Society of High Constables, to the Convention
of Royal Burghs, to the Highland Club, and latterly to the Dean of
Guild Court. He was King's Beadle at the meetings of the General Assembly,
etc.; also a Justice of Peace Constable, and officer to the Stent-masters of
Edinburgh ; and, in short, he monopolised almost every office of a like nature
in the city. At one time, as Officer to the Bailie Court, he had nearly the
whole business of summoning parties and witnesses, and executing other matters
of form before that Court. His duties in this department were so very
The following specimen of Archie's &$ish was found among the papers of the late Dr.
M'Cleish ; the manuscript in the Doctor's handwriting :-"The Mag. of Edinrs. Proclamation for
an iluination on account of au aledgel victory in Rusia over the French Grand Army, 6th Nov.
1813, by Archd. Campbell, their Chief Officer.-'This days gud news caus lumination, but no till
mouday, because the Lord's Supper is to be dispeilued-the moma night frae 7 OG to 10 luminate
weel."'
you." ... BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. the head, and was styled the Provost's Officer, it being his chief duty to wait upon ...

Book 9  p. 628
(Score 1.15)

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Book 11  p. 98
(Score 1.14)

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Book 9  p. 476
(Score 1.13)

OLD AND NEW EDINBURGH. cst. Andrew Sq-
ST. ANDREW SQUARE,
The Royal Eank of Scotland.
The Scottish Provident Institution.
The British Linen Company's Rank
The Scottish Widows' Fund Office.
CHAPTER XXIII.
CHAR L 0 T T E S (2 U X R E.
Charlotte Square-Its Early Occupants-Sir John Sinclair, Bart.-Lamond of that Ilk-Sir Williarn Fettes-Lord Chief Commissioner Adam-
Alexander Dirom-St George's Church-The Rev. Andrew Thornson-Prince Consort's Memorial-The Parallelogram of the first New
Town.
CHARLOTTE SQUARE, which corresponds with that
of St. Andrew, and closes the west end of George
Street, as the latter closes the east, measures about
180 yards each way, and was constructed in 1800,
after designs by Robert Adam of Maryburgh, the
eminent architect ; it is edificed in a peculiarly
elegant and symmetrical manner, all the fasades
corresponding with each 0the.r. In 1874 it was
beautified by ornamental alterations and improvements,
and by an enclosure of its garden area, at a
cost of about d3,000. Its history is less varied
than that of St. Andrew Square.
During the Peninsular war No. z was occupied
by Colonel Alexander Baillie, and therein was the
Scottish Barrack office. One .of the earliest OCCUpants
of No. 6 was Sir James Sinclair of Ulbster, ... AND NEW EDINBURGH. cst. Andrew Sq- ST. ANDREW SQUARE, The Royal Eank of Scotland. The Scottish Provident ...

Book 3  p. 172
(Score 1.13)

......

Book 8  p. 160
(Score 1.12)

......

Book 10  p. 74
(Score 1.1)

......

Book 9  p. 92
(Score 1.1)

......

Book 9  p. 267
(Score 1.1)

......

Book 9  p. 380
(Score 1.1)

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