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Index for “Writer to the Signet”

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Book 8  p. 381
(Score 4.22)

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Book 8  p. 224
(Score 3.9)

John Wilson (18 May 1785 - 3 April 1854) was a Scottish writer, the writer most frequently identified with the pseudonym Christopher North of Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine
people ... Wilson (18 May 1785 - 3 April 1854) was a Scottish writer, the writer most frequently identified with the ...

Book 1  p. x
(Score 3.47)

UPPER HALL, SIGNET LIBRARY. ... HALL, SIGNET ...

Book 11  p. 100
(Score 3.39)

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Book 9  p. 621
(Score 2.89)

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Book 9  p. 220
(Score 2.81)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 243
KO. XCIX.
JOHN DAVIDSON, ESQ., AND LORD HENDERLAND.
GEORGE PATON, ESQ.
LORD MONBODDO AND DR. HUTTON.
MR. JOHN DAVIDSON, the first figure in the division entitled " Conversation,''
was the son of a bookseller in Edinburgh, and followed the profession of
a Writer to the Signet. During the greater part of his life he enjoyed, perhaps,
the most lucrative and respectable business in Edinburgh. He was a man
of superior abilities, and of great acuteness and industry. His literary acquirements
were highly estimated by his friends, to whom he frequently rendered
valuable assistance. Principal Robertson, in the preface of his History of Scotland,
which was given to the world in 1759, makes honourable mention of Mr.
Davidson in these words :-'' The facts and observations which relate to Mary's
letters, I owe to my friend Mr. John Davidson, one of the Clerks of the Signet,
who hath examined this point with his usual acuteness and industry."
Mr. Davidson printed, but did not publish, two tracts: the one on the
Regiam Majestatem, and the other on the Black Acts. In 1771 he printed for
private distribution a thin 4to volume, entitled " Accounts of the Chamberlain
of Scotland in 1329, 1330, and 1331, from the originals in the Exchequer, with
some other curious Papers." 1
He had an only
son, who died before him in early life. The late Mr. Hugh Warrender, his first
clerk, succeeded to his business at his death, which occurred at Edinburgh on
the 29th December 1797. The house built by Mr. Davidson, and for sixty
years successively inhabited by him and Mr. Warrender, was the uppermost
house on the Castle Hill, next to the Castle, on the north side of the street,
and became the property of Sir George Warrender, Bart., who inherited it under
the settlement of his relative. The founder of the family, and first baronet, was
a tradesman of Edinburgh at the beginning of last century ; a circumstance on
which Sir George prides himself exceedingly.
The estate of Stewartfield, acquired by Ifi. Davidson, was, in consequence
of a destination in his settlement, inherited by a younger son of Lord Glenlee.
For many years Mr. Davidson was agent for the Crown.
LORD HENDERLAND is represented as engaged in conversation with
Mr. Davidson--each in the attitude which, upon such occasions, he was wont
In some copies a third appendix is to be found, of which only about a dozen copias were
thrown pff. ... a bookseller in Edinburgh, and followed the profession of a Writer to the Signet . During the greater part of his ...

Book 8  p. 341
(Score 2.74)

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Book 8  p. 585
(Score 2.62)

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Book 8  p. 580
(Score 2.52)

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Book 9  p. 594
(Score 2.38)

Greyfriars Church.] TOMBS.
TOMBS IN GREYFRIARS CHURCHYARD.
1. The hlartyrs' Monument : o Monument of Sir G. McKenzie commonly called '' Blocd McKenzie " 16gz; 3, Wilhm CarJtarrs Rdomer,
and Principal of the Uhiversity of Edinburgh, 17x5 ; 4, Ebtranrx to the South Gmu$ known 85 ihq Covenant4 Rim ; 5, J&nhYhG
Keeper of the Signet, 1614 ; 4 C M y ol DaLy, 1633 ; 7, William Adam, Archirat, 1748, and W b h h n , D.D., 1793. ... Church.] TOMBS. TOMBS IN GREYFRIARS CHURCHYARD. 1. The hlartyrs' Monument : o Monument of Sir G. ...

Book 4  p. 381
(Score 2.33)

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Book 9  p. 163
(Score 2.29)

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Book 9  p. 17
(Score 2.18)

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Book 8  p. 137
(Score 2.17)

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 157
Between the years 1781 and 1785 Mr. Lawson published a full detail of the
proceedings in his case, in a pamphlet occupying nearly 300 pages of letterpress ;
also, '' Three Letters addressed to candid Christians of all denominations."
He immediately thereafter went to London, where he was well received hy
several Dissenting clergymen, and from whom he obtained a license to preach,
which he continued to do for a few years, in connection with the Relief body.
Mr. Lawson died at Leith on the 27th of August 1788.
No. LXVI.
AN EXCHANGE OF HEADS.
HUG0 ARNOT, ESQ.-MR. 'CVILLIADI MACPHERSON,
AND ROGER HOG, ESQ.
THE " Exchange of Heads " is supposed to have taken place betwixt two
individuals, so very opposite in every describable feature, that the one has been
denominated a shadow, while the other, par excellence, may as appropriately be
termed substance. The space between shadow and substance is ingeniously
devoted to the full development of a back view of a third party, who, differing
entirely from either, displays a rotundity of person more than equal to the
circumference of both.
Some account has already been given of MR. ARNOT, whose head, forming
the apex to the solid pyramid of Macpherson's trunk, appears first to the left in
the trio of figures. Respecting his substantial friend, however, whose ponderous
head, as if poised on a needle, seems like an infringement of the laws of gravity,
some amusing gossip has been preserved.
MR WILLIAM MACPHERSON, whose father was sometime deacon of
the masons in Edinburgh, was a Writer to the Signet, and, in many respects,
a man of very eccentric habits. He lived in that famed quarter of the city, the
West Bow, three stairs up, in a tenement which immediately joined the city
wall, and looked towards the west, but which has been recently removed to
make way for the improvements now in progress, and which have all but annihilated
the Bow. Mr. Macpherson continued a bachelor through life, and seemed
from many circumstances to have conceived a determined antipathy to the
" honourable state of matrimony." He had two maiden sisters who kept house
with him ; but whether they entertained similar prejudices, or remained single ... whose father was sometime deacon of the masons in Edinburgh, was a Writer to the Signet , and, in many ...

Book 8  p. 222
(Score 2.12)

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Book 9  p. 323
(Score 2.06)

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Book 9  p. 322
(Score 2.06)

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Book 9  p. 321
(Score 2.06)

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Book 8  p. 122
(Score 2.03)

Beechwood.] SIR ROBERT DUNDAS OF BEECHWOOD. 105
to the Castle of Edinburgh under a strong escort of
their comrades.
General Leslie, and Lieutenant MacLean the
adjutant, having accompanied this party a little
way out of Glasgow, were, on their return, assailed
by a mob which sympathised with the Highlanders
and accused them of being active in sending
away the prisoners. The tumult increased,
stones were thrown ; General Leslie was knocked
down, and he and MacLean had to seek shelter
these documents were not formally executed, were
confused in their terms, and good for nothing in a
legal sense, Mrs. Rutherford of Edgerstoun very
generously fulfilled to the utmost what she conceived
to be the intentions of her father.
Sir Robert Dundas, Bart., of Beechwood, like the
preceding, figures in the pages of Kay. He was
one of the principal Clerks of Session, and Deputy
Lord Privy Seal of Scotland. He was born in
June, 1761, and was descended from the Dundases
BEECHWOOD.
in the house of the Lord Provost till peace
officers came, and a company of Fencibles. One
of the mutineers was shot, by sentence of a
court-martial. The others were sent to America.
On his way back to Edinburgh General Leslie
was seized with a dangerous illness, and died at
' Beechwood House on the 27th of December,
'794.
No will could be found among the General's repositories
at Beechwood, and it was presumed that
he had died intestate. However, a few days after
the filneral, two holograph papers were discovered,
bequeathing legacies to the amount of L7,ooo
among some of his relations and friends, particularly
.&I,OOO each to two natural daughters. Although
110
of Amiston, the common ancestor of whom was
knighted by Charles I., and appointed to the
bench by Charles 11. Educated as a Writer to
the Signet, he was made deputy-keeper of Sashes,
and in 1820 a principal Clerk of Session. He was
one of the original members of the old Royal
Edinburgh Volunteers, of which corps he was a
lieutenant in 1794. He purchased from Lord
Melville the estate of Dunira in Perthshire, and
succeeded to the baronetcy and the estate of
Beechwood on the death of his uncle General Sir
David Dundas, G.C.B., who was for some time
Commander-in-Chief of the forces. Sir Robert
died in 1835.
A winding rural carriage-way, umbrageous and ... SIR ROBERT DUNDAS OF BEECHWOOD. 105 to the Castle of Edinburgh under a strong escort of their ...

Book 5  p. 105
(Score 2.01)

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Book 9  p. 569
(Score 2.01)

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Book 9  p. 374
(Score 1.97)

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Book 9  p. 314
(Score 1.95)

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Book 9  p. 637
(Score 1.94)

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